Meat and cheese are destroying health in the same way as nicotine

Meat and cheese are destroying health in the same way as nicotine

The use of large amounts of meat and cheese in middle age is the same health hazards as smoking, US researchers found in a new study.

Having studied the health data of thousands of men and women over the age of 50 years, the researchers found that those who consume more animal protein, the likelihood of premature death twice as high as among those who does not abuse food protein. In addition, they are four times more likely to die from cancer - which is comparable to smoking. According to the researchers, a protein found in meat, cheese, eggs and other animal products, contributes to tumor growth and accelerates the aging of body cells. They recommend that people aged 50 to 65 years to reduce animal protein intake and instead get it from fish, beans and lentils.

The results are likely to plunge into shock thousands of dieters around the world, who are sitting on a diet high in protein, such as the Atkins diet and the Dukan. However, the good news is that the restrictions do not last forever. As demonstrated by the same survey, rich in animal protein diet is useful for people after 65 years.

Meat and cheese are destroying health in the same way as nicotine

The American researchers recommend that people aged 50 to 65 years old, weighing about 57 kilograms, limited to 45 grams of protein per day, the equivalent of two pork chops.

British experts, however, questioned the results and say that the best way to prevent cancer - to quit smoking, watch your weight, do not abuse alcohol and lead an active lifestyle.

Professor Valter Longo of the University of Southern California examined data on the diet of nearly 6,400 Americans, comparing them with data about their health for the past 18 years. As a result, he found a clear link between high protein content, defined as a fifth of energy intake, and the risk of premature death.

The researchers found that excess protein in the diet is fraught with greater likelihood of dying from cancer or diabetes, according to the latest issue of the Mail Online.