Detroit Then and Now

• Detroit Then and Now

Once the most prosperous American city is now personalize a frustrated American dream. In XX century, Detroit has become the largest center for the automotive industry. But in the second half of the century due to the petrol crisis of the population (mostly white) start to leave, factories shut down, and the city is gradually turning into a ghost, which largely remains today.

Today will be an interesting overview of the series-was gone. Also, remember the story of Detroit.

Detroit Then and Now

Factory Packard-Nord, 1930. From 1958 to 1999, the area was used as an industrial park. Among the tenants was the US Army, a warehouse of toys, several companies are engaged in trade in vehicle spare parts warehouse and a large supermarket. In 1999, the former factory was confiscated by the city for non-payment of real estate tax, and since then empty and destroyed. The building on the left was demolished.

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Neighborhood Brás Park in 1881 and 2013. Brush Park was a prestigious area, where at the end of the 19th century settled the wealthiest residents of Detroit. Expensive mansions around 20 neighborhoods were built up. With the growth of the city in 1900, residents of the mansions began to move to other places, and Brush Park has gradually turned into slums. Today, of the 300 luxury homes once only 70 left.

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Crossroads Woodward Avenue and Greyshet Avenue in 1949 and 2013. Pictured in 1949 on the right side of the building can be seen the Hudson store, which was located at the place 70 years. It was demolished in 1998.

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Grand Circus Park in the 30's and 2013. The area of ​​Grand Circus Park, which is located on the downtown Detroit, has lost a lot of buildings in the '90s and 2000s. On the left - the building of the hotel Taller, which was demolished in 1992. In the center - the holding frame facade Adams Theater. The building was demolished in 2009. Right - Detroit Statler Hotel, demolished in 2005. You may notice that the old and new photographs of the church spire located in different places. During expansion Woodward Avenue in 1936, the bell tower of the Methodist Church traveled deep into the quarter.

Detroit Then and Now

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Detroit Then and Now

The angle of Woodward Avenue and John Ap Street in 1917 and 2013. In this part of the city preserved many old buildings, but most of them were heavily rebuilt.

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Theater Harper in 1941 and 2013. The building was built in 1939. In 1973 it was bought by the company Harpos that changed the sign and began to use the space as a platform for performances of heavy metal bands. The company still exists today, but the building is for sale.

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District of Jefferson Avenue and Conner Street in 1949 and 2010. In the 1960s, the population of Detroit start to decline rapidly. Neighborhood East Jefferson Avenue was once home to the most important industrial enterprises of the city, such as Chalmers, Hudson and Continental. The loss of these companies had a devastating effect on the surrounding areas and has led to a mass exodus of the population to the suburbs.

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Not all areas of Detroit fell into disrepair by the "natural" causes. The expansion project runway of the local airport bands demanded ransom over a hundred houses in the immediate vicinity of the Coleman Young Airport. The process began in 1994 and was extremely slow and haphazard. Part of the house was bought and demolished immediately, while the rest were purchased but left standing. As a result, the remaining residents of the area were surrounded by empty buildings and deserted areas. Abandoned house attracted looters, vagrants and arsonists. Urban services have ceased to serve the district, t. To. City "temporarily" closed traffic on its streets. As a result, the streets have become overgrown with grass, and on vacant plots began to dump garbage. Together with the fall area, hit and property prices. Part of the population is confident that all this was done intentionally, in order to reduce the cost of purchase of the territory.

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Factory Ford Pickett. The building is the first Henry Ford's factory was built in 1904 in midtown Detroit on Piquette Avenue. There's going to all of the first car brand Ford, including early modification of the model T. With the transition to mass production, the company needed new production facilities. To do this, we built a new factory in Highland Park area, and the body Ford Piquette in 1910 was sold to Studebaker. Later it was located mining company and a laundry service. In 2000 the building was purchased and converted into a museum.

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Ford Highland Park. In 1910, Henry Ford moved production of the Model T factory closer housing in Detroit in new spacious premises on Woodward Avenue. The introduction of the conveyor assembly in 1913, revolutionized the automotive industry, but soon made the factory shop obsolete and do not meet production needs. For the production of the new model Ford A new factory at River Rouge was built in 1927, in the shops Highland Park began to produce components, as well as to collect tractors and trucks. In 1956 part of the building was demolished, and the area was empty until the moment when in 1997 there was built a shopping center.

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At the time of opening of the first buildings in 1903, the company Packard factory was one of the most advanced car plants in the world. When its construction, for the first time among the industrial projects of Detroit, was used a material such as concrete. All the production complex area of ​​325 thousand square meters. m was completed in 1911. Losing market of luxury cars in the postwar period, the company was unable to take a different niche and rolled production in 1958. Until the 90s the premises used as warehouses. Then there were abandoned. It writes that it is the largest abandoned factory in the world.

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Factory-Packard South, 1925. Additional housing built to the south of the Grand Boulevard. There were warehouses with spare parts, on truck production line and powerful power plant.

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Packard assembly line, 1941. Partially assembled car bodies move along the bridge over the Grand Boulevard. He pictured.

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Loss of large enterprises, such as the Packard, Hudson and Dodge in the 1950s, has had a devastating impact on the eastern part of the city, where it was located the majority of factories of Detroit. The Catholic Church of St. Albert was the spiritual center of the district Poltaun, once home to more than 40,000 Polish immigrants. Church miraculously survived, but today from the Polish community were a few residents who are going into the service only once a month.

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Factory DeSoto. At the corner of Wyoming Street and McGraw Street once housed a large factory which belonged at different times to different owners: Saxon companies, General Motors and Chrysler. In 1937, Chrysler moved here DeSoto car assembly line, which is produced there until the death of the brand in 1960. Until 2003, the glass is produced for Chrysler cars. In 2011 the factory was demolished.

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Striking workers in front of the factory for the production of transmissions and axles Chevrolet, 1945. After World War II, working automobile factories of Detroit demanded 30% salary increase due to the strongly increased cost of living. When General Motors refused, more than 300 thousand workers went on strike, which lasted 113 days. Conflicts with the unions in the 1940s and 50s were one of several reasons for the withdrawal of automobile production outside of Detroit.

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Detroit has been and still is one of the most segregated cities in America. Blacks lived in Detroit, almost since its inception, but before the First World War their number was small, and they are without any problem fit into the local society. The outbreak of war in the city began to arrive black and white residents of the southern states, who wanted to find a well-paid job in the defense industry. The growth of the black population and imported from the south of racial prejudice led to the stratification of society and the establishment of separate neighborhoods, schools, hotels and so on. P. For black residents. In the photo - the doctors and medical students sitting on the steps of Dunbar Hospital - the first hospital for blacks in Detroit, which was set in an ordinary apartment building. In white black hospitals can refuse medical treatment on account of their skin color. In 1928, the hospital moved into the building a little more, but the original building became a museum. In the photo in 1922 and 2012.

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The first major wave of black immigrants came to Detroit during the First and Second World Wars, with the growth of military production and the subsequent shortage of labor. Black southerners were lured to the city promise of higher wages and a higher standard of living. But they came at a time when Detroit was already experiencing an acute shortage of housing, which is further aggravated due to the large influx of population. To somehow solve the housing shortage, all over the city began to build a federally funded housing complexes, called "housing projects" (in New York, they are now called pradzhektami). Originally they were created on the basis of race with separate living black and white. In 1941 the decision to build a residential complex Sodzhorne-Truth, led to massive protests by locals who sought to prevent the black in her white area. February 27, 1942 hundreds of white gathered on Nevada Street to prevent black families moving in new housing.

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Confrontation moved quickly into numerous fights and brawls. Fortunately, no one was killed. 40 people were injured and more than 200 were arrested. They were mostly black. The move had to be stopped, and city officials began to look for a solution to the problem.

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After months of deliberation, the officials did not come up with anything better than to try to carry the black again, but with the help of the police. The photo shows the vans with property settlers, accompanied by numerous police officers and troops of Detroit Michigan National Guard. At this time, the move took place without incident, but it only further escalate the situation.

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After just a year, racial tensions resulted in street violence and unrest. June 20, 1943 the conflict between black and white teenagers at the Belle Isle spread to surrounding neighborhoods and quickly grew into a force of collision and numerous robberies.

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21 th and 22 th June 1943 Woodward Avenue, which runs through the center of Detroit, was plunged into chaos. The rebels overturned and torched cars, looted shops and beat passers-by with the wrong skin color. By the time the 3 days later riots were finally suppressed by the troops, 34 people were dead and hundreds injured.

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Street fighting in Brush Park. In the photo - a crowd of white burns black car, and the police tried to disperse them with tear gas.

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In July 1967, racial tensions again escalated into widespread violence. It happened after a failed raid Detroit Police Department in one of the illegal bars on 12th Street. Districts faced a wave of unrest, looting and arson, which lasted for four days. In the photo - the very beginning of the rebellion, and a crowd of looters, who robbed the shops on 12th street.

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When the city authorities lost control over the situation, arson and looting spread from the 12th street across the city. In the photo - firefighters battle blaze at the corner of Grand River and Myrtle Avenue. Most of the commercial area along the Grand River was completely destroyed during the riots.

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Looters at a pawn shop on the corner of Oakland and Owen. Pawn shops have been targeted by locals who tried to destroy all debt records stored inside.

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Looting and arson spread throughout the city. Many neighborhoods were never able to recover from the events of 1967 year.

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Soldiers of the National Guard with guns aimed at the rebels.

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Firefighters extinguish under police protection shops along 12th Street. Both sides of the street were badly damaged by fire during the riots and remained empty for many years thereafter. Re-planning began only in 1980, when the street was widened and built up new houses.

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Rebellion was suppressed only after entering the city division of the US Army, who were able to quickly restore order. 43 people died and more than 1000 injured. 7200 were arrested. The city has suffered great damage. From raging fires burned a few days the whole quarters. The consequences were disastrous for Detroit, and the revolt of 1967, became one of the largest in US history.

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Devil's night of 1980.. Starting from the 1970s, more and more often on the night of Halloween began to be mass burning of houses in Detroit. What at first seemed to pranks and mischief, it has become a huge problem for the city. As every year the number of vacant homes increased, and the increased number of targets for arsonists. At its peak in 1984, Halloween was more than 800 arson of buildings in the night. After police managed to significantly reduce their number.

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The white population of Detroit beginning of a steady decline since the late 50-ies of the last century, and the revolt in 1967 only accelerated this process. Representatives of the middle class began to mass move to the suburbs, which has led to the closure of the plurality of outlets in the city. This has led to a surplus in the market of commercial real estate and a large number of vacant buildings. The photo of 1967 year - a quarter of commercial buildings along Grand Boulevard, which was abandoned and then demolished in the 1980s.

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Pictured in 1927 - once a thriving Catholic Church. Agnes in the north of Detroit. Racial and demographic changes have led to a reduction in the number of Catholic parishioners in the city and the closure of the church in 2006.

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The consequences of theft of metal from abandoned buildings as destructive as natural decay, but is much faster. Thieves carried out of the building all that is the slightest value. To get to the metal they have to open the walls and floors of the building and turn into unsuitable for further use. After closing in 2011, the hospital Detroit Hope was put up for sale, and most of its equipment remains in place. When the property was arrested for tax evasion, the guards removed from the site and gutted hospital just a few days. In the photo - May 2012 and October 2013.

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Together with the reduction of the population of Detroit authorities began to close when no longer fire stations, police stations, schools and libraries. In the photo - the library of the John S. Gray, which is one of the oldest surviving buildings in the city library. It opened its doors in 1906 and closed in 1971. The building for some time, it was a community center, but has been vacant for 15 years.

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1975 Wing High School District Highland Park was a strong fire that destroyed a sports hall and a swimming pool. In 1985, a wing was restored for the Arts Center at the City College. The center was closed in 2009 due to financial problems. In the photo - 1985 and 2013.

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Central Station is one of the most recognizable abandonment of Detroit. It was opened in 1913 at the height of the railway boom of America. Station so never worked at full capacity and was closed in the 1970s. The building was abandoned in 1988. In the photo - in 1915 and 2013.

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In fairness it should be noted that not all is bad in Detroit. There are positive aspects. They are few, but they make it clear that the city still has a chance. Below - pictures of objects recovered. Those who were saved from complete destruction.

38. The Grand Army Of-Repablik Building. Built in 1899 for members of the fraternal organization of veterans of the Civil War, the building stood abandoned since 1982. In 2011 it was sold to a new investor for 220 000 dollars. For that amount you are, for example, will be able to buy a very modest apartment in New York. But this is what attracts investors. Currently the building is renovated for renting offices and shops. The photo of 2010 and 2013.

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The old factory building rebuilt under the school. In the photo - 2008 and 2013.

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High school closed in 2009. In 2012 the building was repaired and re-used for the school. In the photo - 2012 and 2013.

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Hall for symphony orchestra. The building was abandoned in 1951. Restoration work began in 1970 and took 20 years. In the photo - 1970 and 2013.

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Hotel Buk-Cadillac was built in 1924 and abandoned in 1984. In the photo - the years 2001 and 2014.

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